360° Coverage : BPA in plastic bottles impairs brain development

1 Updates
BPA in plastic bottles impairs brain development
Photo Credit: Pool, Getty Images

BPA in plastic bottles impairs brain development

Feb 26 2013, 10:58am CST | by

Washington, Feb 26 (IANS) Bisphenol A (BPA), a compound present in plastics and resins, may suppress a gene vital to nerve cell function and impair the growth of the central nervous system, says a new study.

Washington, Feb 26 — Bisphenol A (BPA), a compound present in plastics and resins, may suppress a gene vital to nerve cell function and impair the growth of the central nervous system, says a new...

Filed under: news

YouTube Videos

 
 
 

1 year ago

BPA in plastic bottles impairs brain development

Feb 26 2013, 10:58am CST | by

Washington, Feb 26 (IANS) Bisphenol A (BPA), a compound present in plastics and resins, may suppress a gene vital to nerve cell function and impair the growth of the central nervous system, says a new study.

Washington, Feb 26 — Bisphenol A (BPA), a compound present in plastics and resins, may suppress a gene vital to nerve cell function and impair the growth of the central nervous system, says a new study.

The chemical can be ingested if it seeps into the contents of food and beverage containers, according to medical researchers from Duke University.

"Our study found that BPA may impair the development of the central nervous system and raises the question as to whether exposure could predispose animals and humans to neuro-developmental disorders," said Wolfgang Liedtke, associate professor of medicine, neurology and neurobiology at Duke, who led the study.

BPA, a molecule that mimics estrogen and interferes with the body's endocrine system, can be found in a wide variety of manufactured products, including thermal printer paper, some plastic water bottles and the lining of metal cans, the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reports.

Research in animals has raised concerns that exposure to BPA may cause health problems such as behavioural issues, endocrine and reproductive disorders, obesity, cancer and immune system disorders, according to a Duke statement.

Some studies suggest that infants and young children may be the most vulnerable to the effects of BPA, which led the US Food and Drug Administration to ban the use of the chemical in baby bottles and cups in July 2012.

While BPA has been shown to affect the developing nervous system, little is understood as to how this occurs. The research team developed a series of experiments in rodent and human nerve cells to learn how BPA induces changes that disrupt gene regulation.

Exposing neurons to minute amounts of BPA alters the chloride levels inside the cells by somehow shutting down the KCC2 gene, which makes the KCC2 protein, thereby delaying the removal of chloride from neurons.

MECP2, another protein important for normal brain function, was found to be a possible culprit behind this change. When exposed to BPA, MECP2 is more abundant and binds to the KCC2 gene at a higher rate, which might help to shut it down. This could trigger problems in the developing brain due to a delay in chloride removal.

"Our findings improve our understanding of how environmental exposure to BPA can affect the regulation of the KCC2 gene," Liedtke said.

IANS

Source: IANS

 

Don't miss ...

 

<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/8" rel="author">Luigi Lugmayr</a>
Luigi is the founding Chief Editor of I4U News and brings over 15 years experience in the technology field to the ever evolving and exciting world of gadgets. He started I4U News back in 2000 and evolved it into vibrant technology magazine.
Luigi can be contacted directly at ml@i4u.com. Luigi posts regularly on LuigiMe.com about his experience running I4U.

 

blog comments powered by Disqus

Latest stories

Indians join wave of home buyers in US: NYT
Washington, Oct 2 (IANS) Affluent Indians as also the not-so-super rich Indians are joining a wave of foreign property buyers, who see the recovering US housing market as a safe haven for their money, according to the New York Times.
 
 
Thai scientists discover antibody to cure Ebola
Bangkok, Oct 2 (IANS/EFE) Thai scientists Thursday announced the discovery of a new antibody against the Ebola virus and claimed that it is "more effective" than those that now exist.
 
 
Newly discovered deviant ant species!
Washington, Oct 2 (IANS) People often say that what you are looking for is usually right in front of your face. Researchers from the George Washington University in the US faced the same predicament when they discovered an ant species, Cephalotes specularis, hiding in plain sight.
 
 
Specific network exists in brain for using tools
London, Oct 2 (IANS) Scientists in Munich, while examining the parts of the brain that are responsible for planning and executing complex actions, have discovered that there is a specific network for using tools and utensils.
 
 
 

Latest from the Network

Kris Jenner: Kids come first
Kris Jenner would do anything for her children. The showbiz matriarch - who has kids Khloe, Kourtney, Kim and Rob Kardashian with late ex-husband Robert Kardashian and Kendall and Kylie Jenner with estranged spouse...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
Jennifer Garner had lice for Clooney meeting
Jennifer Garner had head lice when she first met George Clooney. The 42-year-old actress - who has children Violet, eight, Seraphina, five, and Samuel, two, with husband Ben Affleck - had been trying to rid her family...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
Mila Kunis 'so happy' with baby
Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher are ''so happy'' after becoming parents for the first time. The 'Black Swan' actress - who started dating her former 'That 70s Show' co-star in 2012 and got engaged to him earlier this year...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
Tributes pour in for Indian hockey team on Twitter
Incheon, Oct 2 (IANS) Tributes poured in from various distinguished personalities of society for the Indian hockey team after it ended a 16-year drought to win an Asian games gold medal at the Seonhak Hockey Stadium...
Read more on Sport Balla
 
Dedicate gold to Indian soldiers: Sreejesh
Incheon, Oct 2 (IANS) Goalkeeper P.R.Sreejesh, who was the hero of the Asian Games hockey final against Pakistan, Thursday dedicated gold medal to the brave soldiers of the Indian Army. "I dedicate the victory to the...
Read more on Sport Balla
 
India win Asian Games hockey gold, book Rio berth
Incheon, Oct 2 (IANS) Goalkeeper P.R. Sreejesh was the show stopper in the 17th Asian Games hockey final making two brilliant saves in the shoot-outs to give India a 4-2 win via penalties against arch-rivals and...
Read more on Sport Balla
 
Indians join wave of home buyers in US: NYT
Washington, Oct 2 (IANS) Affluent Indians as also the not-so-super rich Indians are joining a wave of foreign property buyers, who see the recovering US housing market as a safe haven for their money, according to the...
Read more on Politics Balla
 
India win women's 4X400m relay gold, shot putter Inderjeet takes bronze
Incheon, Oct 2 (IANS) India finished off their Asian Games athletics campaign on a golden note with the women's 4X400 metres relay team clinching the yellow metal while Inderjeet Singh joined the party by winning the...
Read more on Sport Balla
 
Hockey team win gold after 16 years, women's relay team champions again (Roundup)
Incheon, Oct 2 (IANS) The national anthem was played twice during the day as the men's hockey won the gold medal after 16 long years and the women's 4x400m relay team emerged champions for the fourth consecutive time...
Read more on Sport Balla
 
Big moment for Indian hockey: Walsh
Incheon, Oct 2 (IANS) India's chief hockey coach Terry Walsh described Thursday's Asian Games gold medal victory as "a big moment for the sport in the country". India ended a 16-year gold medal drought, defeating...
Read more on Sport Balla