Massive Internet Security Vulnerability. You Are At Risk. What You Need To Do.

Apr 10 2014, 4:32pm CDT | by

Massive Internet Security Vulnerability. You Are At Risk. What You Need To Do.
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Several days ago, after researchers reported a severe Internet security vulnerability, near hysteric articles began to appear in the press – some even recommending that people change all of their Internet passwords or stay off the Internet altogether. “Facts” were reported incorrectly, and bad ideas have appeared as recommendations; someone following the advice to change all of his passwords might actually put himself at more risk than he was before.

So here’s what you need to know, and what you should – and should not — do:

What happened?

Several days ago, researchers reported a severe vulnerability in OpenSSL – a popular version of the standard SSL technology used by websites to secure web connections for online banking, credit card payments, and other sensitive activities. When you type HTTPS into a web browser (instead of HTTP), or when you otherwise visit a web page that presents a “lock icon” in the browser, you are causing your browser to use SSL to encrypt communications between yourself (the web user) and the web server with which you are communicating. SSL is also used by various mobile apps, and for securing web-based remote access.

At a high level, the programming error that was discovered in OpenSSL means that anyone equipped with the right knowledge and tools – including technologically-sophisticated hackers and criminals – could read encrypted data from the memory of webservers running vulnerable versions of OpenSSL; any data that was transmitted securely – including passwords and credit card numbers – was potentially readable by criminals once it reached the server.

It is estimated that half-a-million sites that were using OpenSSL to ensure the security of data were, in fact, quite insecure.

This is a serious vulnerability. Some might argue that it is the worst vulnerability found (at least in terms of its potential impact) since commercial traffic began to flow on the Internet.

How is the problem being addressed?

Even before the vulnerability, now nicknamed HeartBleed, was announced to the public, a “patch” – that is, an update for OpenSSL – was prepared to fix this vulnerability. Responsible organizations that are running OpenSSL have already applied the patch, and their servers are no longer vulnerable.

Impacted organizations are also invalidating and replacing their SSL certificates – the part of the SSL technology that identifies organizations and allows them to encrypt communications — in case the “keys” to those certificates were compromised. This will help ensure that criminals cannot use the certificates to produce phishing sites that appear to browsers to be legitimate.

So why is there still a problem?

There are several issues – and they are not minor:

1. Some parties may not have updated their servers, and may remain vulnerable.

2. The vulnerability has been widespread for over two years. Criminals may have been aware of it, and exploited it, prior to its discovery by researchers and the subsequent issuance of the patch. It is possible, therefore, that criminals may have been reading passwords, credit card numbers, and the like for quite some time.

3. As alluded to above, SSL technology uses a secret “private key” (think of it as a very long password used to “sign” that the party doing the SSL encryption is actually who it claims to be) to prevent criminals from impersonating legitimate businesses online. Criminals accessing memory may have stolen SSL private keys – so they may be able to impersonate legitimate parties online without producing browser warnings. Replacing hundreds of thousands of certificates takes time – so this vulnerability will not disappear immediately. (Interestingly, one of the reasons that I, along with several other people, created Green Armor’s anti-phishing technology nearly a decade ago was to address this type of situation.)

What advice in the media should you ignore?

Several pieces in the media recommend that people not bank online until the dust settles. Besides the fact that many banks don’t use OpenSSL and were never vulnerable to begin with, regressing to banking-in-person is just not going to happen. And how is not banking online going to help for Facebook and other sites that use HTTPS but are not banks? Impractical security advice is a recipe for security breaches./>/>

Others have recommended that people use vulnerability scanners to check all sensitive sites before using them. Is the average person really going to run a vulnerability scanner before banking online from his cellphone?

Some articles recommended that people change all of their passwords. That is a terrible idea for several reasons.

1. When people create many new passwords at one time they are likely to write them down (bad idea), store them in a computer (which, unless they are properly encrypted and the device secured is also a bad idea), or use passwords similar to one another on multiple sensitive sites (bad idea).

2. Since criminals now know about the vulnerability they are certainly scanning for it and seeking to exploit it. If a site has not yet applied the patch and someone changes her password on that site – criminals may obtain her new password. Considering that is unclear that any crooks actually exploited the OpenSSL vulnerability in the past, and, therefore, your existing password might still be secure (as long as you don’t use it now on a vulnerable system), the risk of changing your password in this case may outweigh the benefits.

3. If someone changes her password on a site that is still vulnerable and uses similar passwords on secure sites, she may actually put herself at risk of having her account at the secure sites breached!

So what should I do?

Before performing sensitive tasks over HTTPS:

Check a reputable list of websites that do not run OpenSSL. Mashable published such a list – and many major banks are on it. If a site did not run OpenSSL on any of its equipment in the last few years it was not vulnerable to the current bug. Of course, if you use the same password on a site that was/is vulnerable as you do on a site that is not vulnerable you should change it on the non-vulnerable site ASAP.

If you check the list and find that a site was indeed running OpenSSL – check if the site was patched. Most (if not all) major sites did patch. In that case, it is probably a good idea to change your password on that site ASAP. Be careful, however, not to weaken the strength of your passwords just because you have to update several at the same time, and do not reuse passwords that you use on sensitive sites. Don’t let HeartBleed cause you to create new password risks.

If you find some site that was vulnerable and for some reason has not confirmed that it has patched (and, hopefully, there should not be too many like that) – I would wait to change my password, and, if possible, either check the site myself using one of the reliable tools to do so (e.g., http://filippo.io/Heartbleed/ ) or refrain from using the site until I could confirm that a patch has been applied. As described above, changing your password before the patch is applied could actually worsen the situation.

Be wary of phishing attacks – type in the URL of any sensitive site to which you are going. Do not click links to get there. While I have, in the past, demonstrated methods of using various exploits to impersonate sites that use SSL, those hacks required much more effort than doing so would take for someone who stole a certificate and key. Until all possibly-pilfered SSL certificates are replaced as described above, the potential for real-looking phishing sites is enormous. So be wary.

Hopefully, browser vendors will also add code to warn users accessing sites running vulnerable versions of OpenSSL – so, make sure to keep your browser up to date.

Of course, the above reflects my opinion, and others may feel free to disagree.

Want to be notified of great articles that can benefit you? Follow me on Twitter at @JosephSteinberg

 
 

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