12 Reasons Why New Zealand's Economic Bubble Will End In Disaster

Apr 17 2014, 9:52pm CDT | by

New Zealand’s economy has been hailed as one of world’s top safe-haven economies in recent years after it emerged from Global Financial Crisis relatively unscathed. Unfortunately, my research has found that many of today’s so-called safe-havens (such as Singapore) are experiencing economic bubbles that are strikingly similar to those that led to the financial crisis in the first place.

Though I will be writing a lengthy report about New Zealand’s economic bubble in the near future, I wanted to use this column to outline key points that are helpful for those who are looking for a concise explanation of this bubble.

Here are the reasons why I believe that New Zealand’s economy is heading for a crisis:

1) Interest rates have been at all-time lows for almost a half-decade

Ultra-low interest rate environments are notorious for fueling credit and housing bubbles, which is how the U.S. housing and credit bubble inflated last decade. New Zealand’s interest rates have been at record lows for nearly five years, which is more than enough time for economic bubbles and related imbalances to form.

Here is the chart of New Zealand’s benchmark interest rate:

Source: TradingEconomics.com

New Zealand’s three-month interbank rate, base lending rate, and 10 year government bond yield are also at or near all-time lows. Like many countries that are experiencing bubbles in recent years, New Zealand’s low interest rates are a byproduct of global “hot money” flows from the United States and Japan, which have both had zero interest rates and quantitative easing programs to boost their economies after the Global Financial Crisis.

Low interest rates in the U.S. and Japan encouraged capital to flow into higher yielding investments in countries such as New Zealand, which led to reduced bond yields and an 85 increase in the value of the New Zealand dollar against the U.S. dollar since 2009. To combat the export-harming currency appreciation and bolster the economy during the financial crisis, New Zealand’s central bank reduced its short-term interest rates to all-time lows.

2) Property prices have doubled since 2004
/>

Following the pattern of many nations outside of the hard-hit U.S., peripheral Europe, and Japan, New Zealand’s housing prices have doubled in the past decade, forming a property bubble:

Source: Global Property Guide

3) New Zealand has the world’s third most overvalued property market
/>

The doubling of New Zealand’s housing prices in the past decade far surpassed household income and rent growth, making the country’s property market the third most overvalued in the world. New Zealand’s home price-to-rent ratio is 77 percent above its historic average and its home price-to-income ratio is 26 percent above its historic average.

4) New Zealand’s mortgage bubble grew by 165% since 2002
/>
/>/>

New Zealand’s housing bubble is driven by a mortgage bubble that grew from approximately NZD $70 billion in 2002 to NZD $186 billion in 2013 – a 165 percent increase in a little over a decade. New Zealand’s mortgage debt bubble grew at a faster rate than its economy during this time, causing the country’s total outstanding mortgage debt-to-GDP ratio to rise from approximately 57 percent to 85 percent.

5) Nearly half of mortgages have floating interest rates

New Zealand’s ultra-low interest rate environment has encouraged the country’s home buyers to make many of the same mistakes that the American home buyers did during last decade’s bubble. One of the gravest of these mistakes is using adjustable or floating rate mortgages, which will reset at higher interest rates when the low interest rate environment ultimately ends.

Almost half of New Zealand’s outstanding mortgages currently have floating interest rates, which is up significantly in the past decade:

Chart source: MacroBusiness

6) Mortgages account for 60% of banks’ loan portfolios

As if the fact that almost half of New Zealand’s mortgages have floating rates isn’t scary enough, mortgages now account for 60 percent of the country’s banks’ loan portfolios, which means that the financial sector is heavily exposed to the eventual popping of the housing bubble.

7) Finance, not agriculture, is New Zealand’s largest industry

Though New Zealand is commonly thought to be an agriculture-based economy, this couldn’t be further from the truth. Agriculture accounts for only 5.1 percent of New Zealand’s GDP, while the finance, insurance and business services sector is the country’s largest sector, contributing 28.8 percent to the GDP. Furthermore, banks account for 80 percent of the total assets of New Zealand’s financial system. Not only is New Zealand’s banking system dangerously exposed to the country’s property and credit bubble, but so is the entire economy.

8) New Zealand’s banks are exposed to Australia’s bubble

New Zealand’s banking system is dominated by four banks that are Australian-owned subsidiaries, which means that New Zealand’s banking system is exposed to the inevitable popping of Australia’s credit and property bubble. Australia’s household debt-to-income ratio recently rose to 177 percent from approximately 110 percent in the year 2000, while housing prices increased 150 percent in nominal terms and 85 percent in real terms. Australia’s housing market is now the world’s fifth most overvalued housing market.

9) Australians and Chinese buyers are inflating the property bubble

An influx of foreign home buyers in recent years has contributed to the inflation of New Zealand’s housing bubble. Australians and Chinese – who both hail from countries that are experiencing bubbles – account for 42 percent of these foreign buyers, which means that the false prosperity booms in Australia and China are spilling over into New Zealand’s housing market.

Here are a few statistics about China economic bubble:

  • China’s total domestic credit more than doubled to $23 trillion from $9 trillion in 2008, which is equivalent to adding the entire U.S. commercial banking sector.
  • Borrowing has risen as a share of China’s national income to more than 200 percent, from 135 percent in 2008.
  • China’s credit growth rate is now faster than Japan’s before its 1990 bust and America’s before 2008, with half of that growth in the shadow-banking sector.

(Note: Both New Zealand and Australia are also exposed to the coming popping of China’s economic bubble because their economies rely heavily on exports to China.)

10) New Zealand has a household debt problem/>/>

New Zealand has the fourth worst household debt-to-GDP ratio among advanced economies, surpassing even the United States:

Source: Reserve Bank of New Zealand

New Zealand’s household debt-to-disposable income ratio soared from 100 percent in the early-2000s to just under 150 percent in recent years thanks in large part to the country’s mortgage bubble. New Zealand’s ultra-low interest rates have prevented its large household debt from becoming an even greater problem, but this situation can change dramatically when interest rates eventually rise again.

11) Government overseas debt has nearly tripled since 2008

New Zealand’s government took advantage of the plunging yields on its bonds (which is courtesy of the global QE and ZIRP-driven bond bubble) after the Global Financial Crisis to nearly triple its overseas borrowing:

Source: Wikipedia; RBNZ

The global bond bubble has provided New Zealand’s government with a low-cost borrowing opportunity that is unlikely to be replicated anytime soon, especially now that the U.S. Federal Reserve is slated to completely taper or end its QE3 bond buying program this year.

12) The New Zealand dollar is overvalued

Hot money inflows (a byproduct of QE and zero interest rate policies) into New Zealand after the financial crisis helped the New Zealand dollar to strengthen by 85 percent against the U.S. dollar:

Source: XE.com

After its strong appreciation against both the U.S. and Australian dollars over the past decade, the New Zealand dollar is now overvalued by as much as 20 percent according to some estimates. New Zealand’s Finance Minister Bill English stated in February that the overvalued dollar is “a concern” because it risks harming the country’s exporters. If the New Zealand dollar’s overvaluation was to abruptly correct and even overshoot to the downside (a possible result of the Fed’s taper), New Zealand’s central bank may be forced to hike its key interest rate to prevent further declines.

How New Zealand’s Economic Bubble Will Pop

New Zealand’s economic bubble will likely pop as a result of rising interest rates across the yield curve, which would put pressure on the country’s property and credit bubbles. New Zealand’s key interest rate is expected to continue rising after its March hike due to rising domestic inflationary pressures, while longer-term bond yields are likely to rise as a side-effect of the Fed’s taper and eventual Fed Funds rate increase. The popping of Australia and China’s bubbles are two other external factors that have a high probability of contributing to the popping of New Zealand’s bubble./>/>

Here is what to expect when New Zealand’s economic bubble truly pops:

  • The property bubble will pop
  • Banks will experience losses on their mortgage portfolios
  • The country’s credit boom will turn into a bust
  • Over-leveraged consumers will default on their debts
  • Stock and bond prices will fall; the New Zealand dollar may weaken
  • Economic growth will go into reverse
  • Unemployment will rise

I will be publishing a full comprehensive report about New Zealand’s economic bubble in the near future, so please follow the directions below to receive my updates.

Please follow me on TwitterGoogle+ and Facebook to stay informed about the most important bubble news and my related commentary.

 
 

Don't miss ...

 

<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/30" rel="author">Forbes</a>
Forbes is among the most trusted resources for the world's business and investment leaders, providing them the uncompromising commentary, concise analysis, relevant tools and real-time reporting they need to succeed at work, profit from investing and have fun with the rewards of winning.

 

blog comments powered by Disqus

Latest stories

Sleep apnea leads to poor aerobic fitness
New York, Nov 25 (IANS) People with sleep apnea, in which breathing repeatedly starts and stops during slumber, are likely to have reduced aerobic fitness, even compared with those of similar body mass indices, new research shows.
 
 
Man with Ebola like symptoms dies in Pakistan
Islamabad, Nov 25 (IANS) A man who was hospitalised with Ebola like symptoms has died, a media report said Tuesday.
 
 
5G services for super-fast internet in the offing
Beijing, Nov 25 (IANS) Researchers are now close to finding how software-defined cellular networking might be used to give smartphone users the next generation of super-superfast broadband - 5G.
 
 
NASA mission to study magnetic fields in universe
Washington, Nov 25 (IANS) The US space agency plans to launch an ambitious Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission in March next year to deploy four identical spacecraft from a single rocket to study magnetic reconnection in the universe.
 
 
 

Latest from the Network

Gwen Stefani wants to 'disappear' from her children
Gwen Stefani is tempted to escape her everyday stresses by going to a motel. The 45-year-old beauty - a mother of three children - says that although she loves her kids, she dreams about disappearing from them at times...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
Ed Sheeran dances his way to weight loss
Los Angeles, Nov 25 (IANS) Singer Ed Sheeran has lost weight and he credits dance classes for transforming his looks. The 23-year-old is flaunting a lean figure after spending weeks training with professional dancer...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
P. Diddy 'regrets not pursuing relationship with Cameron Diaz'
P. Diddy regrets not pursuing a romantic relationship with Cameron Diaz. The music mogul and the actress were said to have dated between 2008 and 2012, and it's been claimed Diddy, 45, wishes he took their union further...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
Kendra Wilkinson says Hugh Hefner offered her an escape
Kendra Wilkinson entered the Playboy Mansion because it offered her an escape route. The blonde beauty is currently appearing in 'I'm a Celebrity ... Get Me Out of Here!' and has been reflecting on her relationship with...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
Halle Berry accuses ex of racism
Gabriel Aubry made ''completely and totally unacceptable'' racial slurs against Halle Berry, a court has been told. The 48-year-old actress, who dated the French-Canadian model between 2005 and 2010, has taken her...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
Chris Hemsworth loves teasing his wife
Los Angeles, Nov 25 (IANS) Actor Chris Hemsworth says he loves to tease his wife Elsa Pataky by pretending that he cannot understand her, when he gets distracted. The 31-year-old, who was named People magazine's...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
What makes Nicki Minaj shy?
Los Angeles, Nov 25 (IANS) Nicki Minaj has flaunted sensual outfits with confidence several times, but she says she has felt "shy" about them sometimes. The 31-year-old, who recently donned an all-black ensemble at...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
Ebola crisis may result in more hunger: UNDP report
United Nations, Nov 25 (IANS) Wild price swings caused by the Ebola health crisis are making it more difficult for households to feed themselves and make a stable living, according to a new UN report released Monday....
Read more on Business Balla
 
US court sentences Mexican drug trafficker to 22 years
Chicago, Nov 25 (ians/EFE) a Mexican man was sentenced Monday to 22 years in federal prison for smuggling cocaine to Chicago. "I tell you on behalf of all citizens of Chicago... we are tired of this drug trafficking...
Read more on Politics Balla
 
Justin Bieber named highest-earning entertainer under 30
Justin Bieber is the highest-earning entertainer under the age of 30, according to Forbes. The controversial musician earned as much as $80 million during the 12-month period between June 2013 and June 2014, in part...
Read more on Celebrity Balla