After Game Four Meltdown, 2014 Penguins Playoff Tickets Lowest In Four Years

Apr 25 2014, 10:55pm CDT | by

The Pittsburgh Penguins were founded in 1967 and have have had a lot of success winning three Stanley Cups, four conference championships and eight division championships.  Along the way, they’ve had some of the best players in the sport playing for them, including Mario Lemieux, Jaromir Jagr and Sidney Crosby.   As a result of the success and talent, Penguins fans have become one of the most passionate in the sport.  While Pittsburgh has a median income that is almost 10% below the national average, Penguins tickets are consistently at the top of the list when it comes to NHL ticket prices.  The Penguins had a season average this year of $204, which was good for 10th most expensive in the league. Every other team ahead of them was either Canadian or in major market, like Chicago, New York or Boston. When it comes to the playoffs, Penguins playoff tickets have been even higher, with three out of their last ten round one games having an average price above $300.  Of those ten games, none has been lower than $200. 2014, however, is another story, with every game in their round one series having an average list price under $200 on the secondary market.

Game five tomorrow night at Consol Energy Center is the cheapest game yet, with an average price of $174 and a get-in price of $87.  That’s almost 40% below the average price of Blue Jackets playoff tickets for game six.  Despite a series tied at two games each, it seems that Penguins fans are throwing in the towel, or at least not spending much money (by historical standards) to see if the Penguins can advance to the next round. While there are issues with the Penguins overall, much of the pessimism stems form their goaltender, Marc-Andre Fluery.  After giving up a three-goal lead and a blue line game winner in game four, Penguins fans have to be questioning if spending their money on a team with one of the most notoriously unreliab playoff net minders is a good decision.  The majority of the games on the Pirates schedule have ticket for under $5. From that perspective, $174 would be the equivalent of 34.8 Pirates games this summer, which is not a bad alternative.  $174 is also enough to get a ticket to any of the games on the recently-announced Steelers schedule.

Of course, for panicking fans, it’s worth remembering that Fluery is a Stanley Cup winning goalie, and that the Penguins have the best player on the planet in their yellow and black.   If they can get things back on track Saturday night, Game Seven has prices that are more familiar to Penguins fans. The current average price for the deciding game seven is $272.35, which would make it the 6th most expensive game for the Penguins in the last four years and familiar territory for fans looking to catch post-season hockey in Pittsburgh.

 
 
 

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